For many years, patients requiring anticoagulation therapy had limited options, with warfarin being the predominant drug prescribed. Despite its efficacy, warfarin comes with numerous challenges, including dietary restrictions, frequent blood monitoring, and a significant risk of bleeding complications.

As medical research has advanced, so has the development of more convenient and safer alternatives. Eliquis (apixaban) and Pradaxa (dabigatran) are two novel oral anticoagulants that promise to revolutionize the management of conditions like atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism.

This article will comprehensively compare Pradaxa vs. Eliquis, evaluating their efficacy, safety profiles, and side effects to assist patients in making well-informed choices regarding their anticoagulation treatment.

Key Differences Between Eliquis and Pradaxa

ParametersEliquisPradaxa
Average retail price$727.96$437.61
Active ingredientApixabanDabigatran
Generic AvailabilityYes (in Canada)Yes
Approved indicationsNonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary embolism (PE), DVT and PE prophylaxis after hip/knee replacementNonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary embolism (PE), DVT and PE prophylaxis after hip/knee replacement
Drug classificationFactor Xa inhibitorDirect thrombin inhibitor
Dosage FormsTablets (2.5 mg, 5 mg)Capsules (75 mg, 110 mg, 150 mg)
Frequency of administrationTwice dailyTwice daily
Effectiveness and safety profileSimilar efficacy to Pradaxa, but shows a superior safety profile, particularly regarding bleeding risks.Similar efficacy to Eliquis, but shows a higher risk of bleeding.
Onset of action2.5 to 3.3 hours0.5 to 2 hours
Side effectsBleedingBleeding and gastrointestinal issues
Reversal AgentsAndexanet alfa (Andexxa®)Idarucizumab (Praxbind®)

Efficacy and Safety Profile

Both Eliquis and Pradaxa are effective in preventing stroke and systemic embolism (blockage of blood vessels throughout the body) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, studies have shown some differences in their efficacy and safety profiles.

1. For Atrial Fibrillation (AF)

Apixaban vs Dabigatran for Atrial Fibrillation (AF)

A nationwide cohort study compared the long-term effectiveness and safety of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation. After extracting data comparing apixaban and dabigatran alone, here’s what the study found:

Both apixaban and dabigatran are equally effective in reducing stroke/systemic embolism risk in patients with AF. However, apixaban appears to have a better safety profile, especially concerning major bleeding and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which are critical considerations for patients. Although, dabigatran shows an advantage in reducing all-cause mortality compared to apixaban.

2. For Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation (NVAF)

Researchers used a comprehensive US administrative claims database to examine patients with NVAF who were taking dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban between October  2010 and February 2015. The main outcomes evaluated included the incidence of stroke and systemic embolism (as measures of effectiveness) and major bleeding (as a measure of safety) during the treatment period.

The study found no significant differences in the risk of stroke or systemic embolism among apixaban and dabigatran. However, when evaluating major bleeding risk, apixaban showed a lower risk compared to dabigatran.

3. For Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism (PE)

Eliquis vs Pradaxa - For Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism (PE)

Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes both DVT and PE, has a significant risk of recurring after the initial incident. To compare the efficacy and safety of various anticoagulants, including apixaban and dabigatran, for extended VTE treatment, a systematic review and network meta-analysis were performed.

Here’s a detailed interpretation:

  • Mortality: Apixaban is estimated to more than double the risk of death compared to dabigatran (value = 2.17). However, the CrI ranges from 0.39 to 12.56, which crosses 1. Therefore, this increase is not statistically significant and could be due to random chance or data variability.
  • CRNM Bleeding: Apixaban reduces the risk of CRNM bleeding by 53% compared to dabigatran (value = 0.47). Yet, the CrI crosses 1, indicating this reduction is not statistically significant.
  • Major Bleeding: Apixaban reduces the risk of major bleeding by 76% compared to dabigatran (value = 0.24). However, the CrI crosses 1, making this reduction not statistically significant.
  • Major or CRNM Bleeding: Apixaban reduces the risk of major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding by 58% compared to dabigatran (value = 0.42). This reduction is statistically significant as the horizontal line does not cross the dashed line.
  • VTE and VTE-related Death: Apixaban is estimated to increase the risk by 77% compared to dabigatran (value = 1.77). However, this increase is not statistically significant as the CrI crosses the dashed line.

Both apixaban and dabigatran are effective in preventing VTE. However, apixaban has a more favorable safety profile in terms of lowering the risk of bleeding compared to dabigatran.

4. For DVT and PE prophylaxis following hip/knee replacement surgery

Researchers conducted a systematic review, meta-analysis, and indirect treatment comparisons of rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and apixaban versus enoxaparin for VTE prevention following total hip or knee replacement. This included indirect comparisons between apixaban and dabigatran.

Relative risks for symptomatic VTE, clinically relevant bleeding, deaths, and a net clinical endpoint (a composite of symptomatic VTE, major bleeding, and death) were calculated using a random effects meta-analysis.

For DVT and PE prophylaxis following hip/knee replacement surgery

This bar chart compares the relative risks of apixaban versus dabigatran for various clinical outcomes. To interpret:

  • Net Clinical Endpoint: Apixaban shows virtually no difference in the net clinical endpoint compared to dabigatran, with a relative risk of 0.99. The confidence interval (0.61 to 1.61) crosses 1, indicating this result is not statistically significant.
  • Major Bleeding: Apixaban shows a 14% lower risk of major bleeding compared to dabigatran. However, the confidence interval crosses 1 (0.41 to 1.83), indicating this result is not statistically significant.
  • Clinically Relevant Bleeding: Apixaban shows a 27% lower risk of clinically relevant bleeding compared to dabigatran. The confidence interval (0.57 to 0.94) does not cross 1, indicating this result is statistically significant.
  • Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism: Apixaban shows a 16% higher risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolism compared to dabigatran. However, the confidence interval crosses 1 (0.31 to 4.28), indicating this result is not statistically significant.

Both apixaban and dabigatran are effective in preventing VTE following total hip or knee replacement. However, apixaban demonstrates a significant reduction in the risk of clinically relevant bleeding compared to dabigatran, suggesting superior safety regarding bleeding risk.

Overall, Eliquis and Pradaxa are effective anticoagulants for various conditions, including atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. However, Eliquis consistently demonstrates a superior safety profile to Pradaxa, particularly regarding bleeding risks.

Side Effects

The most common side effect of both Eliquis and Pradaxa is bleeding. However, clinical trials have also reported non-bleeding adverse events.

Eliquis Side Effects

  • In risk reduction of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF)

Aside from bleeding events, less common side effects of Eliquis included drug hypersensitivity, such as skin rashes and anaphylactic reactions (allergic edema). Additionally, syncope was reported in less than 1% of patients receiving Eliquis for NVAF in the AVERROES trial.

  • For the treatment of DVT and PE, and to reduce the risk of their recurrence

Side effects experienced by at least 1% of patients treated for DVT and PE in the AMPLIFY study include:

  • Epistaxis
  • Contusion
  • Hematuria
  • Menorrhagia
  • Hematoma
  • Hemoptysis
  • Rectal hemorrhage
  • Gingival bleeding

The same adverse reactions occurred in patients receiving extended DVT and PE treatments in the AMPLIFY-EXT study, except for menorrhagia, hemoptysis, and rectal hemorrhage.

Less frequent side effects in patients treated with Eliquis in the AMPLIFY or AMPLIFY-EXT studies include:

  • Blood and lymphatic system disorders: Blood loss anemia
  • Gastrointestinal disorders:
    • Hematochezia: Blood in stool
    • Hemorrhoidal hemorrhage: Bleeding hemorrhoids
    • Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: GI bleeding
    • Hematemesis: Vomiting blood
    • Melena: Black, tarry stools
    • Anal hemorrhage: Bleeding from the anus
  • Injury, poisoning, and procedural complications:
    • Wound hemorrhage: Bleeding from a wound
    • Postprocedural hemorrhage: Bleeding after a procedure
    • Traumatic hematoma: Bruising from an injury
    • Periorbital hematoma: Black eye
  • Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: Muscle bleeding
  • Reproductive system and breast disorders:
    • Vaginal hemorrhage: Vaginal bleeding
    • Metrorrhagia: Irregular menstrual bleeding
    • Menometrorrhagia: Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding
    • Genital hemorrhage: Bleeding from the genital area
  • Vascular disorders: Bleeding
  • Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders:
    • Ecchymosis: Bruising
    • Skin hemorrhage: Skin bleeding
    • Petechiae: Small red/purple spots on the skin
  • Eye disorders:
    • Conjunctival hemorrhage: Blood in the eye
    • Retinal hemorrhage: Bleeding in the retina
    • Eye hemorrhage: Bleeding in the eye
  • Investigations:
    • Blood urine present: Blood in urine
    • Occult blood positive: Hidden blood in stool or urine
    • Occult blood: Hidden blood
    • Red blood cells urine positive: Blood cells in urine
  • General disorders and administration-site conditions:
    • Injection-site hematoma: Bruise at injection site
    • Vessel puncture-site hematoma: Bruise at the site where a blood vessel was punctured
  • For the prophylaxis of DVT and PE following hip or knee replacement surgery

Side effects experienced by patients treated with Eliquis during hip or knee replacement surgery in the Phase II APROPOS Trial and the three Phase III studies (ADVANCE-1, ADVANCE-2, and ADVANCE-3 trials) include:

  • Nausea
  • Anemia (including blood loss anemia and anemia after surgery)
  • Contusion or bruise
  • Hemorrhage or bleeding (including internal bleeding, vaginal bleeding, and bleeding from the urethra)
  • Bleeding after a procedure (including post-surgery bruising, wound bleeding, bruising at the puncture site, and catheter-related bleeding)
  • Elevated liver enzymes (including high ALT levels)
  • Increases in Aspartate aminotransferase
  • Increases in Gamma-glutamyltransferase

Less common side effects in Eliquis-treated patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery:

  • Blood and lymphatic system disorders: Low platelet count
  • Vascular disorders: Low blood pressure (including low blood pressure during procedures)
  • Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders: Nosebleed, coughing up blood
  • Gastrointestinal disorders:
  • GI bleeding (including vomiting blood and black stools)
    • Blood in stool
    • Gum bleeding
    • Rectal bleeding
  • Hepatobiliary disorders:
    • Abnormal liver function tests
    • High alkaline phosphatase levels
    • High bilirubin levels
  • Renal and urinary disorders: Blood in urine (including related lab findings)
  • Injury, poisoning, and procedural complications:
    • Wound discharge
    • Bleeding at the incision site (including bruising at the incision site)
    • Bleeding during surgery
  • Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: Muscle bleeding
  • Eye disorders: Eye bleeding
  • Immune system disorders: Allergic reaction

Pradaxa Side Effects

In clinical trials evaluating Pradaxa for lowering the chance of stroke and widespread blood clots in adults with NVAF, adverse reactions besides bleeding included dyspepsia, which encompasses symptoms such as:

  • Upper abdominal pain
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Epigastric discomfort

Patients also experienced gastritis-like symptoms, including:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Esophagitis
  • Erosive gastritis
  • Gastric hemorrhage
  • Hemorrhagic gastritis
  • Hemorrhagic erosive gastritis
  • Gastrointestinal ulcers

Additionally, drug hypersensitivity reactions, such as urticaria, rash, and pruritus, were reported, as well as severe anaphylactic reactions, including allergic edema and anaphylactic shock. These side effects were also observed in patients using Pradaxa for treating and reducing the risk of recurrent DVT and PE, as well as for preventing DVT and PE following hip replacement surgery.

In pediatric patients treated for venous thromboembolism (VTE), the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions included:

  • Dyspepsia
  • Gastro-esophageal reflux disease
  • Decreased gastric pH
  • Esophagitis

Other reported symptoms were upper abdominal pain, vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea. For the reduction in the risk of recurrence of VTE in pediatric patients, the adverse reactions were generally comparable to those observed in adult patients.

Mechanism of Action

Eliquis and Pradaxa are both direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) used to prevent and treat various thromboembolic conditions. While they share a common purpose, their mechanisms of action differ significantly.

How does Eliquis work?

Eliquis prevents blood clots by blocking a protein called factor Xa, which is crucial for clot formation. By inhibiting factor Xa, Eliquis also reduces the production of thrombin, another essential protein for forming blood clots. It targets both the free-floating factor Xa in the blood and the factor Xa already part of a clot. This action helps prevent the formation of new blood clots and stops existing ones from growing.

One advantage of Eliquis is its high selectivity for factor Xa, being 30,000 times more selective for this protein than for other similar proteins involved in blood clotting. This results in minimal impact on other proteins and processes in the body.

How does Pradaxa work?

Unlike Eliquis, which indirectly inhibits thrombin production, Pradaxa works by directly inhibiting thrombin. It is a key enzyme in the blood clotting process, responsible for converting fibrinogen into fibrin, the protein that forms the structural basis of blood clots. By directly binding to and blocking thrombin, Pradaxa stops the transformation of fibrinogen into fibrin, effectively inhibiting clot formation.

Approved Indications

Doctor holding a bottle with pills prescribing them to a patient for treatment.

Pradaxa, approved in 2010, was the first new oral anticoagulant since warfarin, introducing direct thrombin inhibitors. In 2011, Xarelto became the first factor Xa inhibitor approved by the FDA, followed by Eliquis in 2012 as the third novel oral anticoagulant for thromboembolic disease management.

Eliquis and Pradaxa share several common approved indications. These are:

  • Stroke and systemic embolism risk reduction in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF)

NVAF is an irregular heart rhythm from the atria without involving heart valves. This causes the atria to quiver, leading to blood pooling and clot formation, which can travel to the brain and cause a stroke or other systemic embolic events. A stroke occurs when the brain’s blood supply is interrupted, leading to potential brain damage or death. Systemic embolism happens when a blood clot blocks blood flow to an organ, potentially causing serious conditions like heart attacks, kidney failure, or limb ischemia.

  • Preventive treatment for Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) following hip or knee replacement surgery

DVT is when blood clots form in the deep veins, usually in the legs. After hip or knee replacement surgery, patients are at increased risk for DVT due to reduced mobility and the potential for blood vessel injury during surgery. This is critical because DVT can lead to serious complications like pulmonary embolism (PE).

Note: According to the latest prescribing information, Eliquis is approved for the prophylaxis of DVT following both hip and knee replacement surgeries, indicating its broader application in orthopedic surgical contexts. In contrast, Pradaxa is only approved for the prophylaxis of DVT following hip replacement surgery, limiting its use in similar scenarios involving knee replacements.

  • Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis

Management of DVT aims to reduce symptoms, prevent the clot from traveling to the lungs (which can cause PE), and avoid long-term complications like post-thrombotic syndrome, characterized by chronic pain and swelling in the affected limb.

  • Management of Pulmonary Embolism

PE occurs when a blood clot, usually originating from the deep veins of the legs, travels to the lungs and blocks one or more pulmonary arteries. This can lead to severe respiratory issues and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

  • Preventing recurrence of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism

Once anticoagulation therapy is discontinued, around 10% of venous thromboembolic (VTE) patients (including DVT and PE) experience a recurrence within the first year, and about 30% have a recurrence within 10 years. The risk of recurrence varies based on several factors.

One advantage of Pradaxa is that it has pediatric indications. Specifically, Pradaxa is approved for:

  • Treating venous thromboembolic events in pediatric patients: Those who are aged 8 to under 18 years and who have been previously treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for at least 5 days.
  • Preventing recurrence of venous thromboembolic events in pediatric patients: For patients aged 8 to under 18 years who have previously undergone treatment.

While both Eliquis and Pradaxa are extensively used for various thromboembolic conditions, Pradaxa’s additional indications for pediatric use highlight its broader therapeutic applications in these areas.

Dosing and Administration

Eliquis is available in tablet form with two dosage strengths–2.5 mg and 5 mg. In contrast, Pradaxa is offered in capsule form with three dosage strengths–75 mg, 110 mg, and 150 mg. Below is a comparison of the dosing guidelines for Eliquis and Pradaxa:

IndicationEliquis DosagePradaxa Dosage
Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in NVAF5 mg orally twice daily; 2.5 mg twice daily if criteria met*150 mg orally twice daily; 75 mg twice daily for severe renal impairment
Treatment of DVT and PE10 mg orally twice daily for the first 7 days, then 5 mg twice daily150 mg orally twice daily after 5-10 days of parenteral anticoagulant
Prophylaxis of DVT Following Hip Replacement Surgery2.5 mg orally twice daily, taken 12 to 24 hours after surgery, for 35 days110 mg on the first day (1-4 hours after surgery and after hemostasis has been achieved), then 220 mg once daily for 28-35 days**
Prophylaxis of DVT Following Knee Replacement Surgery2.5 mg orally twice daily for 12 days (The initial dose

should be taken 12 to 24 hours after surgery)

Not indicated
Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE2.5 mg orally twice daily after at least 6 months of initial treatment150 mg orally twice daily after the previous treatment
Treatment of VTE in Pediatric PatientsNot indicatedBased on body weight, after at least 5 days of initial parenteral anticoagulant therapy***
Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of VTE in Pediatric PatientsNot indicatedBased on body weight, after completion of initial treatment***

*The Eliquis dose is reduced to 2.5 mg in NVAF patients with at least two of the following characteristics:

  • age ? 80 years
  • body weight ? 60 kg
  • serum creatinine ? 1.5 mg/dL

**If the Pradaxa dose is not initiated on the day of surgery, begin treatment with 220 mg once daily after achieving hemostasis.

***11 kg to 15 kg (75 mg/twice daily)

16 kg to 25 kg (110 mg/twice daily)

26 kg to 40 kg (150 mg/twice daily)

41 kg to 60 kg (185 mg/twice daily)

61 kg to 80 kg (220 mg/twice daily)

81 kg – greater (260 mg/twice daily)

Reversal Agents

Reversal agents are medications used to counteract the effects of anticoagulants, effectively reversing their blood-thinning properties. They are critical in situations where a patient taking an anticoagulant experiences severe bleeding or requires emergency surgery, and the anticoagulant effect needs to be quickly neutralized.

Eliquis Reversal Agent

Andexanet alfa (Andexxa®) is the reversal agent for Eliquis and other factor Xa inhibitors. It is an engineered protein similar to human factor Xa, allowing it to bind to factor Xa inhibitors effectively. Unlike natural factor Xa, Andexanet alfa has a slight change in its structure so that it doesn’t cause further blood thinning. By binding to factor Xa inhibitors, Andexanet alfa neutralizes their anticoagulant effects, allowing normal blood clotting to resume. It also inhibits the tissue-factor pathway inhibitor, increasing thrombin production to promote clotting. This dual action quickly reverses anticoagulation when needed.

The ANNEXA-A and ANNEXA-R trials showed that Andexanet alfa reverses the anticoagulant activity of apixaban within minutes, maintaining this effect during infusion without clinical toxicity. Another study found that it significantly decreases anti-factor Xa activity within two minutes of administration. The most common side effects of Andexxa were urinary tract infections,  pneumonia, and infusion-related reactions.

Andexanet alfa has two dosing regimens:

  • Low Dose: 400 mg IV bolus at 30 mg/min, followed by a 2-hour IV infusion at 4 mg/min.
  • High Dose: 800 mg IV bolus at 30 mg/min, followed by a 2-hour IV infusion at 8 mg/min.

For Eliquis, here’s the general dosing guideline:

Last Eliquis Dose< 8 Hours Prior/Unknown to the last dose of Eliquis? 8 Hours Prior to the last dose of Eliquis
? 5 mgLow doseLow dose
> 5 mg / unknownHigh doseLow dose

Pradaxa Reversal Agent

The reversal agent for Pradaxa is Idarucizumab (Praxbind®), a humanized monoclonal antibody fragment. It binds to dabigatran with an affinity about 350 times higher than that of thrombin, effectively neutralizing dabigatran’s anticoagulant activity.

In a 2016 study, idarucizumab rapidly reversed the effects of dabigatran. Bleeding stopped in 97% of patients within 24 hours, with most patients ceasing to bleed within about 11 hours. For those requiring surgery, 92% experienced normal bleeding control during the operation. Idarucizumab was generally well tolerated, making it an effective and specific treatment for reversing dabigatran’s anticoagulant effects in emergencies or when there is severe, uncontrolled bleeding. Common side effects include headache, constipation, and nausea.

The recommended dose of Praxbind is 5 g, administered as two separate vials, each containing 2.5 g/50 mL of idarucizumab. It’s important to note that the efficacy and safety of idarucizumab in pediatric patients have not been established.

Cost and Generic Availability

Both Eliquis and Pradaxa are brand-name medications and can be quite expensive. The list price for a 30-day supply of Eliquis is $594, with the average retail price reaching up to $727.96. Pradaxa, although less costly than Eliquis, still carries a high price tag, averaging $437.61 at retail.

The FDA has approved generic versions of both Eliquis and Pradaxa. However, generic Eliquis won’t be available in the US for several more years due to a patent extension by Bristol Myers Squibb and Pfizer, the original makers of the drug. Initially set to expire in February 2023, the patent has been extended until November 2026.

Fortunately, Canadian pharmaceutical manufacturer Apotex Inc. has launched the first generic alternative to Eliquis in Canada. As a result, the cheapest place to buy Eliquis and Pradaxa, including their generic versions, is from Canadian mail-order pharmacies. For example, Eliquis is available for just $157 at Pharma Giant, with its generic version priced as low as $90. Meanwhile, Pradaxa’s price ranges from $65 to $140, with its generic equivalent costing between $60 and $115.

Onset of Action

Eliquis and Pradaxa have quick onset times, which is advantageous for patients requiring prompt anticoagulation.

How long does it take for Eliquis to work?

After taking a single dose of apixaban, it takes about 2.5 to 3.3 hours for the anticoagulant effects to start. The highest levels of the drug in the blood are reached within 1 to 3 hours after taking it. Apixaban is absorbed in the stomach and small intestine, with about 50% of the drug being effectively absorbed into the bloodstream.

Around 87% of apixaban binds to proteins in the blood, which helps it stay in the bloodstream. The drug mostly stays within the blood vessels and doesn’t spread much to other tissues in the body.

How long does it take for Pradaxa to work?

After being taken orally, dabigatran works quickly, reaching its highest levels in the blood within 0.5 to 2 hours. This rapid action can eliminate the need for an initial injectable anticoagulant. Dabigatran has a low risk of interactions with food and other drugs.

Its half-life is 12 to 14 hours in patients with normal kidney function, allowing for once—or twice-daily dosing. The drug also wears off quickly, and about 80% of it is excreted unchanged by the kidneys.

Takeaway

Eliquis and Pradaxa are both effective and relatively safe options for preventing stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, as well as for the treatment and prevention of DVT and PE. The choice between the two depends on individual patient factors, including bleeding risk, renal function, drug interactions, and cost considerations. Consulting with a healthcare provider is essential to determine the most appropriate anticoagulant therapy based on a patient’s specific needs and medical history.

Related Readings

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Frequently Asked Questions

Which is better, Eliquis or Pradaxa?

Both Eliquis and Pradaxa have demonstrated similar efficacy in preventing stroke and systemic embolism in patients with NVAF and in treating and preventing DVT and PE. However, Eliquis has a better safety profile, particularly with a lower risk of bleeding compared to Pradaxa.

Can Eliquis make you tired?

Fatigue was not identified as a common side effect in clinical trials for Eliquis. However, feeling tired can be a sign of blood loss or anemia, which are potential side effects of the medication. If you experience fatigue while on Eliquis, consult your doctor. They may need to check for signs of internal bleeding.

Can Eliquis cause hair loss?

Hair loss is not recognized as a side effect of apixaban. However, it has been reported with other anticoagulants like heparin and warfarin. The precise cause of hair loss with these medications is unclear but is believed to involve telogen effluvium, which is a common form of hair loss that is typically temporary.

Can Pradaxa be crushed?

No, Pradaxa capsules should not be crushed, chewed, or opened. They need to be swallowed whole to ensure the medication is released and absorbed correctly in your body.

What pain medication can I take with Eliquis or Pradaxa?

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is generally safe to take with Eliquis or Pradaxa. Avoid NSAIDs like ibuprofen or aspirin unless advised by your healthcare provider, as they can increase the risk of bleeding.

Can you take Eliquis less than 12 hours apart?

Eliquis should be taken twice a day, roughly 12 hours apart. Taking doses closer together is not recommended, as it can increase side effects and reduce effectiveness. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember, but do not double up on the next dose.

Are there any foods to avoid with Eliquis or Pradaxa?

Eliquis can have interactions with specific foods and supplements, including grapefruit, turmeric, ginger, herbal tea, and St. John’s wort. These interactions can either heighten your risk of bleeding or alter the medication’s effectiveness. In contrast, Pradaxa does not have any dietary restrictions.

Is Eliquis an antiplatelet?

No, Eliquis is an anticoagulant, not an antiplatelet. An antiplatelet helps prevent blood clots by stopping platelets, a type of blood cell, from clumping together.

Are there any interactions between Eliquis and alcohol?

Moderate alcohol consumption is generally safe with Eliquis, but excessive drinking can increase the risk of bleeding. It’s best to consult your healthcare provider for personalized advice.

Can Eliquis cause diarrhea?

Diarrhea was not reported in any of the clinical trials for Eliquis. However, diarrhea has been observed in pediatric patients treated with Pradaxa for venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Can Eliquis be crushed?

Yes. For patients who cannot swallow whole tablets, 5 mg and 2.5 mg Eliquis tablets can be crushed and either suspended in water, 5% dextrose in water (D5W), or apple juice, or mixed with applesauce, and then administered orally immediately.

Can Eliquis cause confusion?

Confusion is not a common side effect of Eliquis, but it’s been reported as one of the adverse effects post-marketing. This appears to be more prevalent in older adults, although the exact cause is unknown. If you experience dizziness, lightheadedness, or difficulty thinking clearly while taking Eliquis, consult your doctor. They can help identify the cause and may consider switching you to a different blood thinner if necessary.

Can Eliquis cause shortness of breath?

Shortness of breath is a serious side effect and may indicate an allergic reaction or other severe condition. If you experience shortness of breath while taking Eliquis, seek immediate medical attention.

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